U.S. State Department Reaffirms Policy on Macedonia’s Constitutional Name

The U.S. Department of State in its Daily Press Briefing on April 11, 2007 reaffirmed that there has been no change in U.S. policy towards referring to Macedonia by its constitutional name.

The United Macedonian Diaspora is grateful for the continued support from the United States of the Republic of Macedonia’s right to be called what its people chose when they sought independence in 1991.


 Source: U.S. Department of State

QUESTION: I have a NATO question. The day before yesterday, the President signed the NATO Consolidation Act of 2007. In this text there is a reference to the Republic of Macedonia. There is a parenthesis close to the name with the indication FYROM. Since you recognized this country with its constitutional name in 2004, can we take from this that there is some kind of change of policy, second thoughts? What we can read in this? You still recognize the country with its constitutional name? What’s the name of the parenthesis there and the signing by the President of this text?

MR. MCCORMACK: Right. Well, no, I have something here for you. It says that the U.S. policy on Macedonia’s name has not changed. Since 2004 we have recognized Macedonia by its constitutional name, Republic of Macedonia, in our bilateral relations, as you noted, and we continue to strongly support ongoing UN-led talks between Greece and Macedonia in finding a mutually acceptable solution to the name issue.

QUESTION: Your answer I can’t understand that the remaining of the parenthesis there with the FYROM mentioned. Is there any pressure exercised towards the Macedonians to accept any solution or to get more serious in the process of an agreement with Greece on that issue?

MR. MCCORMACK: Well, we would encourage them to come to some agreement with the Greek Government on the issue. You know, clearly it’s a sensitive, emotional issue on both sides of the border. When the Secretary last met with Foreign Minister Bakoyannis, she encouraged efforts that were underway by the Greek Government to resolve the issue.

QUESTION: So it’s —

QUESTION: FYROM is the name that NATO uses? While it may not be the name the United States uses, Macedonia is still referred to as FYROM within NATO, and particularly because of the sensitivity of the issue involving the Greeks?

MR. MCCORMACK: I don’t understand your point, Matt.

QUESTION: Well, I’m saying I think that’s a quicker answer.

MR. MCCORMACK: Thanks. Next time I’ll let you come up here.

QUESTION: So, it’s meaningless, the parenthesis there, as far as policy concerns?

MR. MCCORMACK: There’s no change in policy.